Best HESI A2 Vocabulary Practice Test

This is a HESI A2 vocabulary practice test with 10 sample questions. Visit our website to take thousands of free HESI practice questions!

If you want to study at a nursing school, you need to pass the HESI A2 exam. The exam covers a total of 10 different topics including math, reading, vocabulary, grammar, biology, chemistry, anatomy and physiology, and physics. This test aims to evaluate your scholastic aptitude for nursing programs and measures your overall general education.

The Hesi A2 vocabulary test includes a 55-item exam that contains basic vocabulary often used in the health care field, and you must finish the test in 50 minutes. Although the test is not really hard, you won’t pass it without being well-prepared for the exam.

Below is a HESI A2 vocabulary practice test with 10 sample questions. Answer the questions and then scroll down to check the answers and explanations. You can access our website and app to learn and practice more HESI A2 vocabulary practice questions. To practice more HESI A2 Vocabulary Practice Test, click HERE or visit our HESI practice test website to practice with full HESI practice exams.

Hesi A2 Vocabulary Practice Test Questions

1.Which of these is the best definition of the word taciturn?

A. alert

B. attentive

C. reserved

D. uncooperative

2. Choose the best meaning for the word underlined in the following sentence: The standard procedure is to inject the chip under the skin using a larger diameter needle.

A. Gauge

B. Pain-inflicting

C. Thickness

D. Width

3. Choose the best meaning for the word underlined in the following sentence: One of the parameters of the Nurse Practice Act is that nurses are accountable for patient safety.

A. available

B. ready

C. responsible

D. vigilant

4. Choose the best meaning for the word underlined in the following sentence: Lawrence’s feistiness may be compensation for his shortened stature in the wheelchair.

A. Offsetting

B. Substituting

C. Symbiotic

D. Yielding

5. Choose the best meaning for the word underlined in the following sentence: The impending bill from the hospital cast of the mood of anxiety over her father’s healing process.

A. Coming

B. Happening soon

C. In the future

D. Possible

6. Which word most nearly means enervate?

A. debilitate

B. energize

C. fortify

D. rectify

7. Choose the best meaning for the word underlined in the following sentence: Perhaps the most well-known hematologic character is Count Dracula, whose attraction to blood is fictionally famous.

A. anemic

B. blood-related

C. medical freak

D. science fiction

8. Choose the best meaning for the word underlined in the following sentence: When the night nurse looked in on the patient in 212 at 2, his affect — sitting, rocking, moaning, with a blanket over his head revealed acute pain.

A. inappropriate actions

B. observable emotions

C. sleeplessness

D. suppression of feelings

9. Choose the best meaning for the word underlined in the following sentence: The potent smell of death permeated the alley.

A. Dizzying

B. Numbing

C. Paralyzing

D. Strong

10. Choose the best meaning for the word underlined in the following sentence: Ms. Olsen’s knee can be flexed within certain parameters.

A. Exceptions

B. events

C. limits

D. time periods

Answers and Explanations

1. C

If someone is described as taciturn, it means they are “reluctant to speak,” so reserved would be the best answer. Being taciturn does not imply anything regarding one’s state of attention or cooperation.

2. D

The width of a circular or cylindrical object

3. C

“Accountable” means responsible. One of the rules in the Nurse Practice Act is that nurses are responsible for the safety of their patients.

As the manager of this team, I am ultimately accountable for the team’s performance.

“Vigilant” means always aware.

The military officer remained vigilant at his post, keeping an eye out for a possible ambush.

4. A

Offsetting or making up for something.

5. A

Likely to occur soon

6. A

The word enervate means to weaken or cause someone to feel drained of energy, weak, or tired. Debilitate has the closest meaning in making someone feel weak or infirm or lacking strength or stamina. Energize and fortify are really antonyms of enervate, and rectify means “to right a wrong,” which has nothing to do with causing weakness.

7. B

Relating to blood and blood-producing organs

8. B

The appearance of observable emotions

9. D

Producing a strong effect

10. C

A characteristic or constant factor, limit 

Top 15 Nurse Life Hacks That Will Make Your Nursing Career Easier

In this blog post, we'll share 15 nurse life hacks that will make your nursing career so much easier. Let's read it to get what you need!

As a nurse, you are tasked with caring for others and providing the best care possible. It can be hard to stay on top of all that is involved in your job, but these hacks will help simplify things! In this blog post, we’ll share 15 nurse life hacks that will make your nursing career so much easier.

1. When you prime your IV, go as slow as possible

This is because tiny air bubbles can easily be formed when you go full blast with the flow. Therefore, you can start with clamp the tube, then fill the drip chamber and let the fluid flow slowly.

2. When using a tourniquet, you should use gauze to prevent hair pulling

Patients can be suffered from pain because of the friction with hair created by a tourniquet. You can try placing a thin sheet of gauze in between the tourniquet and your patient’s skin to handle this problem. 

3. Removing blood stains by hydrogen peroxide

When blood left stains on your white uniform or favorite scrub suit and you have to wear them for your entire shift, those blood stains make you look as you’ve just had a battle. But don’t worry, you can easily remove these stains by dropping a few drops of hydrogen peroxide on them. Hydrogen peroxide is considered a stain remover. 

4. Prevent pinching 

Another interesting life hack you need to know is folding a washcloth and tuck it under the front of the bedside commode seat to prevent pinching. 

5. Try double insertion of Foley catheters when you didn’t hit the mark

Honestly, not only new nurses miss the mark but also a veteran fail doing this. Almost all nurses fail to get a foley cath to return when inserting it to a female patient. In this case, you should leave the first catheter in place and try the same procedure with another Foley catheter, aiming higher this time. 

6. Powder a bedpan 

Before you put a patient on a bedpan, remember to powder it. The purpose is to make it easier for evacuation. This life hack is very useful especially when you’re caring for obese patients. 

7. For patients who have a needle phobia

When you have to extract blood for patients who have a needle phobia, remember to ask them to take ten slow and deep breaths before starting to extract blood. The reason is patients can lessen fear and anxiety by deep breathing. 

8. When handling code brown, try the triple gloving method

The triple gloving method not only helps you save time but also limits the chances of your bare hands getting in contact directly with patient’s excretions. The first pair of gloves are used to clean your patient’s poop. The second one is meant for putting on a patient’s new diaper. And, using the third pair of gloves to place a fresh sheet on his bed and in disposing of waste.

9. Eliminate unpleasant odors

Adding grounded coffee beans in your station when you can’t stand the smell is another useful tip you need to know. Coffee powder is a good odor neutralizer, so putting a small container filled with grounded coffee beans right at the center of the area to eliminate the unpleasant smells.

10. If you’re feeling nauseous, using alcohol swabs

You can relieve nausea immediately by swiping an alcohol swab under your nose. This life hack also is very useful if you’re suffering from sinus pain.

11. For stinky situations, put peppermint oil in your mask

When you or your patients feel like vomiting from the bad odors, you can try to place a few drops of peppermint oil in your face mask and breathe through your mouth.

12. You should wear two masks

When you wear two masks, you can smear toothpaste or peppermint oil on the inside of the second mask that helps you tolerate the smell. In addition, it also prevents you from getting toothpaste or peppermint oil on your face or mustache.

13. Using alcohol on matted hair 

Alcohol is a really useful substance in nursing life hack as it also can be used to remove tangles. You can apply a few drops of alcohol on tangle areas when you can’t get through your patient’s hair with a hairbrush. This tip makes your work easier and faster as the alcohol works by breaking any substance that’s causing the tangles. Remember to rub thoroughly alcohol on the hair but gently.

14. Giving patient’s family members a job to do

Involving family members in caring for patients is an effective nurse life hack because the family always wants to be helpful. You can assign them minimal tasks such as holding a hand during a painful procedure, so they will feel like they’re contributing. 

15. Fake a pulse

Your patients will be conscious and immediately start to breathe more if you tell them you are counting their respirations. As a result, you cannot read exactly the patient’s respirations. Instead, don’t tell the patient what you are really doing when checking respirations on a patient. You should pretend like you are assessing his pulse and count the respirations. In addition, it will be better if you can place the patient’s arm across the chest so you can easily feel its rise and fall. 

To sum up, though nursing is not an easy job, it doesn’t mean you can’t make your work easier. You can try to apply our 15 nursing life hacks to make your time on the job easier and more efficient. 

Nurse Life Hacks

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HESI A2 Chemistry Formulas You Need to Know

To pass the HESI Chemistry section, you have to remember all the basic chemistry formulas. Let's check the top 8 HESI Chemistry Formulas here!

Studying for the HESI® Chemistry Test can be tough because it combines theoretical and mathematical knowledge. In addition to being filled with a lot of new information, you have to remember all the chemistry formulas that are necessary in order to pass. However, you can be well-prepared for the HESI Chemistry Test by accessing our website to learn and take the free HESI practice test and questions.

In this blog post, we will cover eight key formulas for your upcoming HESI® Chemistry Exam. Although you are not allowed to use them during the test, they are extremely useful tools. Remember to learn and practice using these formulas before stepping into the exam room.

Table of Formulas for the Hesi Chemistry Test

HESI A2 Chemistry Formulas

HESI A2 Chemistry Formulas

To take more details about the HESI Chemistry test, please check our Chemistry Study Guide For HESI A2 Exam

HESI A2 Reading Comprehension Practice Test

This is a sample of the HESI A2 Reading Comprehension Practice Test with 10 practice questions. Visit our website to take more. All Free!

You are required to pass the Hesi A2 test or a different nursing school entrance exam to be admitted to a nursing school program. Hesi A2 reading comprehension is one section of the Hesi A2 exam. This test includes 47 questions that test your comprehension of short passages of reading and sentences, including your ability to identify main ideas, word meanings, context, and logical inferences.

Below is a sample of the HESI A2 Reading Comprehension Practice Test with 10 practice questions. Answer the questions and then scroll down to check the answers and explanations. You can access our website and app to learn and practice more HESI A2 reading comprehension practice questions. For more questions for other HESI sections, visit our free HESI practice test website now!

HESI A2 Reading Comprehension Practice Test Questions

Paragraph: Lyme disease is caused by ticks. More specifically, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia bacteria, which are carried by ticks. When ticks infected with this bacteria bite humans, the bacteria can be transmitted into the bloodstream, causing an illness known as Lyme disease.

The symptoms of Lyme disease include fever, headache, fatigue, and joint and muscle pain. One of the most noticeable signs is a rash that looks like a series of red rings radiating out from the bite. This usually appears a week after the tick bite. However, not everyone with Lyme disease gets this rash.

The good news is that Lyme disease can be treated with antibiotics. Most people recover quickly and fully. However, if Lyme disease is not treated properly, patients can suffer from debilitating symptoms weeks, months, and even years after the bite. This condition is known as post-treatment Lyme disease (PTLD) or chronic Lyme disease (CLD).

To protect yourself from Lyme disease, always cover your skin with clothing or insect repellent when hiking or camping. If you get bitten by a tick, remove the tick right away; most cases of Lyme disease require the tick to be attached for 36 to 48 hours. If red rings appear, see a doctor right away. Lyme disease can be harmful, but it is preventable and treatable with early intervention.

1. Why would the author include the detail “most cases of Lyme disease require the tick to be attached for 36 to 48 hours” in paragraph 4?

A. To contradict the argument regarding the severity of Lyme disease

B. To inform the reader regarding the cause of Lyme disease

C. To offer an example of quick recovery from the disease

D. To support the reasoning behind immediate tick removal

Paragraph: Smallpox is one of the most deadly and dangerous diseases affecting the human population across the world. The first recorded epidemic was in 1350 BC during the Egyptian-Hittite war, and it was quite prevalent in the late 1800s through a large part of the 1900s. Approximately five hundred million people were infected with the disease prior to its eradication in the 1970s, with the last case being in Somalia in 1977. Symptoms of infection included excessive bleeding, high fever, delirium, vomiting, and a raised pink rash. Most cases of smallpox ended in death and survivors were often seriously maimed by pockmarks, blindness, or infertility. The pain and suffering remained for a lifetime after the disease was gone.

There is no known cure for smallpox, only preventative vaccinations. Because smallpox was wiped out in the 1970′s, the World Health Organization (W.H.O.) recommended that all countries stop vaccinating for the disease in 1980. This means that today, most young people are not vaccinated against the disease. Because the disease is considered eradicated, the issue of what to do with the remaining government-held vaccines has been an issue of debate. Should the stored vaccines be destroyed since the disease is no longer a concern, or do we keep them in storage for research or in case of an unexpected outbreak? Experts at the Center for Disease Control (C.D.C.) and the World Health Organization have spent an enormous amount of time researching this issue and have given much-educated thought to the matter. Reportedly the W.H.O. wants to destroy all vaccines, however, some scientists feel the destruction could do more harm than good.

The issue of bioterrorism adds another layer of complexity to the issue. In the case of smallpox, just a small amount of the virus released in the air could infect thousands of people in 6-24 hours. If such a disease were used as a weapon, we would obviously want the vaccine available for use. However, the fact that the vaccine still exists allows the use of smallpox for bioterrorism in the first place. If we could be sure all of the vaccines were destroyed, the decision may be a bit easier, But what if the vaccine were only partially destroyed, and the remainder was used by an unfriendly nation?

In this world of global unrest and increasing technology, bioterrorism will come an increasing concern. The smallpox virus could be a serious threat to world health should any nation engage in the act of bioterrorism against an enemy. The question remains: do we run the risk of bioterrorism by continuing to store the medicine for several hundred smallpox vaccinations or do we destroy the vaccine and pray that there is no outbreak of the deadly virus? Because it is unknown at this time if researchers are able to re-create the vaccine, either solution may have permanent consequences.

2. Which of these statements can be inferred from the second paragraph of the accompanying article on smallpox?

A. Smallpox is a very deadly disease.

B. Smallpox is one of the oldest known diseases, dating back to ancient Egypt.

C. The W.H.O. and the C.D.C disagree about how to handle the remaining vaccines.

D. There is no dispute as to how the remaining vaccines should be handled.

Paragraph: In 1841 a young man addressed an anti-slavery meeting in Massachusetts. He talked about what it was like to be separated from one’s family as a child. He talked about being beaten and overworked. He talked about learning how to read and write in secret. He talked about what it was like to be a slave. Perhaps one of the reasons the listeners were so impressed with the speaker was because he had been a slave himself.

Frederick Douglass was born into slavery in 1818 in Maryland. His last name was Bailey, the name of his mother. First, he was separated from his mother, then his grandmother. He eventually was sent to work for a family named Auld. Sophia Auld taught Frederick how to read and write. By the time her husband stopped her, Frederick had learned enough to progress on his own. Later, Frederick worked for a man named Covey, who often beat him. One night Frederick resisted the beating and the two men fought for two hours. This was a dangerous thing for a slave to do, but Covey finally gave up. Frederick has never beaten again.

In 1836, Frederick and other slaves tried to escape. Someone betrayed them and the attempt failed. Shortly after that, Frederick met Anna Murray, a free black woman, and the two fell in love. In 1838, Frederick planned another escape, and this time he successfully reached New York City. He and Anna were married shortly thereafter. Frederick decided to change his last name to symbolize his new freedom. He took the name Douglass from a character in a book a friend of his was reading at the time.

Frederick Douglass’s presence was a tremendous boost to the anti-slavery movement. Anyone who had doubts about the morality or violence of slavery had only to listen to the articulate former slave describe his former life. After President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, Douglass helped recruit black soldiers to fight for the Union in the Civil War. He died in 1895 after a long, full life.

3. What happened first?

A. Douglass addressed an anti-slavery meeting.

B. Douglass escaped from slavery.

C. Douglass resisted the beating of a man named Covey.

D. Douglass took a new name.

Paragraph: Smallpox is one of the most deadly and dangerous diseases affecting the human population across the world. The first recorded epidemic was in 1350 BC during the Egyptian-Hittite war, and it was quite prevalent in the late 1800s through a large part of the 1900s. Approximately five hundred million people were infected with the disease prior to its eradication in the 1970s, with the last case being in Somalia in 1977. Symptoms of infection included excessive bleeding, high fever, delirium, vomiting, and a raised pink rash. Most cases of smallpox ended in death and survivors were often seriously maimed by pockmarks, blindness, or infertility. The pain and suffering remained for a lifetime after the disease was gone.

There is no known cure for smallpox, only preventative vaccinations. Because smallpox was wiped out in the 1970′s, the World Health Organization (W.H.O.) recommended that all countries stop vaccinating for the disease in 1980. This means that today, most young people are not vaccinated against the disease. Because the disease is considered eradicated, the issue of what to do with the remaining government-held vaccines has been an issue of debate. Should the stored vaccines be destroyed since the disease is no longer a concern, or do we keep them in storage for research or in case of an unexpected outbreak? Experts at the Center for Disease Control (C.D.C.) and the World Health Organization have spent an enormous amount of time researching this issue and have given much-educated thought to the matter. Reportedly the W.H.O. wants to destroy all vaccines, however, some scientists feel the destruction could do more harm than good.

The issue of bioterrorism adds another layer of complexity to the issue. In the case of smallpox, just a small amount of the virus released in the air could infect thousands of people in 6-24 hours. If such a disease were used as a weapon, we would obviously want the vaccine available for use. However, the fact that the vaccine still exists allows the use of smallpox for bioterrorism in the first place. If we could be sure all of the vaccines were destroyed, the decision may be a bit easier, But what if the vaccine were only partially destroyed, and the remainder was used by an unfriendly nation?

In this world of global unrest and increasing technology, bioterrorism will come an increasing concern. The smallpox virus could be a serious threat to world health should any nation engage in the act of bioterrorism against an enemy. The question remains: do we run the risk of bioterrorism by continuing to store the medicine for several hundred smallpox vaccinations or do we destroy the vaccine and pray that there is no outbreak of the deadly virus? Because it is unknown at this time if researchers are able to re-create the vaccine, either solution may have permanent consequences.

4. What is the primary purpose of the accompanying article on smallpox?

A. to examine the World Health Organization’s view on smallpox

B. to examine the cause and cure for smallpox

C. to examine the issue of what to do with the remaining smallpox vaccines

D. to examine why smallpox is no longer relevant

Paragraph: The Science of Taste

Have you ever looked at your tongue in a mirror? If so, you have probably noticed that it is bumpy. The bumps on your tongue are called papillae. Each one of the papillae contains hundreds of taste buds. You also have taste buds on the roof of your mouth and on your epiglottis, which is located at the top of your throat. The taste buds send messages to your brain that tell you about its basic flavor—that is, whether you are eating something salty, sweet, bitter, sour, or umami. Umami is hard to describe, but it is most often called a “meaty” or “savory” flavor. Foods with an umami flavor include meat broth, cheese, and soy sauce.

Your mouth and tongue also have receptors that send information about things besides the basic flavors of food. Your mouth has temperature receptor cells that can tell whether a food is piping hot or ice cold. Other receptors give information about the texture of food or how spicy it is.

But just being able to tell whether what you are eating is sour, cold, crunchy, or spicy is not truly tasting the food. For example, orange soda and root beer are both sweet, cold, and bubbly, but they do not taste the same. In order to get the full flavor of your food, you also need to use your sense of smell. The upper part of your nose contains special cells called olfactory receptors. They send messages about what things smell like to your brain. As you chew your food, chemicals quickly travel to the olfactory receptors in your nose. When your brain gets information from both the olfactory receptors and the taste buds, you experience the full flavor of what you are eating.

5. According to the passage, what are taste buds responsible for?

A. Giving information about the texture of food

B. Sending messages to the brain regarding the flavor of food

C. Transmitting information about the smell of food

D. Understanding whether or not something is spicy

Paragraph: A favorite author for over 100 years, Theodor Seuss Geisel was born on March 2, 1902. Today, we celebrate the birthday of the famous “Dr. Seuss” by hosting Read Across America events throughout the month of March. Schoolchildren around the country celebrate the “Doctor’s” birthday by making hats, giving presentations, and holding read-aloud circles featuring some of Dr. Seuss’s most famous books.

But who was Dr. Seuss? Did he go to medical school? Where was his office? You may be surprised to know that Theodor Seuss Geisel was not a medical doctor at all. He took on the nickname Dr. Seuss when he became a noted children’s book author. He earned the nickname because people said his books were “as good as medicine”. All these years later, his nickname has lasted and he is known as Dr. Seuss all across the world.

Think back to when you were a young child. Did you ever want to try “green eggs and ham.”? Did you try to “Hop on Pop”? Do you remember learning about the environment from a creature called The Lorax? Of course, you must recall one of Seuss’ most famous characters; that green Grinch who stole Christmas. These stories were all written by Dr. Seuss and featured his signature rhyming words and letters. They also featured made-up words in order to enhance his rhyme scheme and even though many of his characters were made up, they sure seem real to us today.

And what of his “signature” book, The Cat in the Hat? You must remember that cat and Thing One and Thing Two from your childhood. Did you know that in the early 1950s there was a growing concern in America that children were not becoming avid readers? This was, book publishers thought because children found books dull and uninteresting. An intelligent publisher sent Dr. Seuss a book of words that he thought all children should learn as young readers. Dr. Seuss wrote his famous story The Cat in the Hat, using those words. We can see, over the decades, just how much influence his writing has had on very young children. That is why we celebrate this doctor’s birthday each March.

6. Why is the publisher in the last paragraph referred to as “intelligent?”

A. The publisher knew Dr. Seuss would be able to create a book that sold well.

B. The publisher knew how to read.

C. The publisher knew kids did not like to read.

D. The publisher knew that Dr. Seuss would be able to write a book that would get young children interested in reading.

Paragraph: On a bad day, have you ever been irritable? Have you ever used a harsh tone or even been verbally disrespectful to your parents or teachers? Everyone has a short temper from time to time, but current statistics indicate that between 16% and 20% of a school population suffer from a psychological condition known as Oppositional Defiance Disorder, or ODD.

ODD symptoms include difficulty complying with adult requests, excessive arguments with adults, temper tantrums, difficulty accepting responsibility for actions, low frustration tolerance, and behaviors intended to annoy or upset adults. Parents of children with ODD can often feel as though their whole relationship is based on conflict after conflict.

Unfortunately, ODD can be caused by a number of factors. Some students affected by ODD suffer abuse, neglect, and severe or unpredictable discipline at home. Others have parents with mood disorders or have experienced family violence. Various types of therapy are helpful in treating ODD, and some drugs can treat particular symptoms. However, no single cure exists.

The best advice from professionals is directed toward parents. Therapists encourage parents to avoid situations that usually end in power struggles, to try not to feed into oppositional behavior by reacting emotionally, to praise positive behaviors, and to discourage negative behaviors with timeouts instead of harsh discipline.

7. As used in this passage, the phrase feeds into most nearly means:

A. Abuse

B. Discourage

C. Encourage

D. Ignore

Paragraph: Lyme disease is caused by ticks. More specifically, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia bacteria, which are carried by ticks. When ticks infected with this bacteria bite humans, the bacteria can be transmitted into the bloodstream, causing an illness known as Lyme disease.

The symptoms of Lyme disease include fever, headache, fatigue, and joint and muscle pain. One of the most noticeable signs is a rash that looks like a series of red rings radiating out from the bite. This usually appears a week after the tick bite. However, not everyone with Lyme disease gets this rash.

The good news is that Lyme disease can be treated with antibiotics. Most people recover quickly and fully. However, if Lyme disease is not treated properly, patients can suffer from debilitating symptoms weeks, months, and even years after the bite. This condition is known as post-treatment Lyme disease (PTLD) or chronic Lyme disease (CLD).

To protect yourself from Lyme disease, always cover your skin with clothing or insect repellent when hiking or camping. If you get bitten by a tick, remove the tick right away; most cases of Lyme disease require the tick to be attached for 36 to 48 hours. If red rings appear, see a doctor right away. 

8. What is the main idea of the passage?

A. Lyme disease can be harmful, but it is preventable and treatable with early intervention.

B. Lyme disease can be life-threatening if not treated properly in the early stages.

C. Lyme disease is characterized by its symptoms, including a distinct rash and fever.

D. Lyme disease produces various symptoms, but it is preventable and can be treated in its early stages.

Paragraph: First, be sure to keep the broken ends quiet. Keep the adjacent joints still. Should these joints bend, the muscles will act against the fractured bone and cause motion. Give the victim first aid for shock. Apply a sterile dressing to the fracture if it is compound. Do not try to push back a protruding bone. When you are splinting the fractured area, the end will slip back when the limb is straightened. An ice bag should be used with all fractures, sprains, and dislocations. A simple method of preventing the movement of the fragments is to place the limb on pillows. Splints may also be used to keep the limb from moving. Breaks of the ribs or skull bone need no splints as they are held fast by other bones and tissue.

9. A break that needs no splint is one in the…

A. Arm.

B. Foot.

C. Leg.

D. Ribs.

Paragraph: Alfalfa thrives on land which contains lime, and gives poor results when this ingredient is deficient. The explanation is simple: there is a community of interest between the very low microscopic animal life, known as bacteria, and plant life, generally. In every ounce of soil, there are millions of these living germs which have their allotted work to do, and they thrive best in soils containing lime. If one digs up a root of alfalfa (it need not be an old plant, the youngest plant will show the same peculiarity), and care is taken in exposing the root (perhaps the best method is the washing away of the surrounding earth by water), some small nodules attached to the fine, hair-like roots are easily distinguished with the naked eye. These nodules are the home of a teeming, microscopic, industrious population, who perform their allotted work with the silent, persistent energy so often displayed in nature.

10. Which of the following is an accurate paraphrasing of the underlined phrase?

A. Bacteria and alfalfa plants have a symbiotic relationship.

B. Bacteria in alfalfa is worth studying.

C. Many people are intrigued by the relationship between bacteria and plant life.

D. The gardening community is very invested in the bacteria found in alfalfa.

Answers and Explanations

1. D

To support the reasoning behind immediate tick removal

In paragraph 4, the author states that removing a tick as soon as possible is a protective measure against Lyme disease. Therefore, the author includes the detail “most cases of Lyme disease require the tick to be attached for 36 to 48 hours” in order to support the reasoning behind immediate tick removal.

To inform the reader regarding the cause of Lyme disease is incorrect. Although Lyme disease is caused by ticks, the detail does not offer support to the cause of Lyme disease. Therefore, To inform the reader regarding the cause of Lyme disease is incorrect.

The supporting detail “most cases of Lyme disease require the tick to be attached for 36 to 48 hours” does not contradict or mention the severity of Lyme disease. To offer an example of quick recovery from the disease is incorrect. The detail does not have a direct correlation between recovery time, nor does it relate to the rate at which one recovers.

2. C

The last line of the second paragraph states, “Reportedly the W.H.O. wants to destroy all vaccines, however, some scientists at the C.D.C. feel the destruction could do more harm than good.” While smallpox is both an old and deadly disease, these factors are not mentioned in the second paragraph of the article.

3. C

Douglass’ resisting Covey’s beating is described in the third paragraph. The next (fourth) paragraph describes his escape from slavery and then taking a new name to symbolize his new freedom in 1838. The introduction describes his addressing an anti-slavery meeting in 1841. The ensuing paragraphs flashback to a brief biography.

4. C

The issue of what to do with the remaining smallpox vaccines is brought up several times in the article. In the second paragraph, it states, “Because the disease is considered eradicated, the issue of what to do with the remaining government-held vaccines has been an issue of debate.” In the conclusion, the article again mentions, “The question remains: do we run the risk of bioterrorism by continuing to store several hundred smallpox vaccinations or do we destroy the vaccine and pray that there is no outbreak of the deadly virus?” The other options are either not mentioned or are untrue.

5. B

Sending messages to the brain regarding the flavor of food.

In paragraph 1, the passage states that taste buds send messages to the brain regarding the basic flavors of food.

Giving information about the texture of food is incorrect. Receptors, not taste buds, are responsible for giving information regarding texture, as noted in paragraph 2.

Transmitting information about the smell of food is incorrect. Receptors, not taste buds, are responsible for giving information regarding the smell of food, as noted in paragraph 2.

Understanding whether or not something is spicy is incorrect. The spiciness and overall flavor of food are conveyed through receptors, as noted in paragraph 2.

6. D

Choice The publisher knew how to read is incorrect because we can assume that all book publishers must know how to read. Choice The publisher knew kids did not like to read is incorrect because it says in the article that more than one publisher was concerned about whether children liked to read. The last choice is incorrect because there is no mention in the article about how well The Cat in the Hat sold when it was first published.

7. C

Feed into in this sentence means to encourage oppositional behavior.

8. D

If caught in the early stages, Lyme disease is an easily treatable illness. The statement Lyme disease produces various symptoms, but it is preventable and can be treated in its early stages includes main points from the text regarding its symptoms, prevention, and treatment.

While the statement If caught in the early stages, Lyme disease is an easily treatable illness is true and included in the text, it is a supporting detail and not the main idea.

The statement Lyme disease is characterized by its symptoms, including a distinct rash and fever describes a supporting detail regarding the symptoms of the disease.

The statement Lyme disease can be life-threatening if not treated properly in the early stages is incorrect because the text does not describe the disease as life-threatening.

9. D

Of the choices offered, only rib fractures are identified in the article as needing no splints. Skull fractures, not a choice here, are also identified as not needing splinting. Fractures that should be splinted include breaks of an arm, foot, leg

10. A

This question asks you to choose the sentence that has the closest meaning to the underlined phrase. Paraphrase the underlined portion in your own words, and then select the answer choice that best fits. “A community of interest” indicates that bacteria and alfalfa plants work together. This type of relationship can be described as symbiotic.

 

HESI A2 Anatomy and Physiology Practice Test

This is a sample of the HESI A2 Anatomy and Physiology practice test. Let's check it to know the test format for this section!

You are required to pass the HESI A2 exam if you want to study at a nursing school. This test aims to evaluate your scholastic aptitude for nursing programs and measures your overall general education. Although the test is not really hard, you won’t pass it without being well-prepared for the exam. The Hesi A2 exam covers lots of topics, and Anatomy and Physiology is one of them.

This is a sample of the HESI A2 Anatomy and Physiology practice test. Let’s check it to know the test format for this section! Answer the questions and then scroll down to check the answers and explanations. 

To take more questions or practice for other sections of the HESI exam, visit our free HESI practice test website now!

HESI A2 Anatomy and Physiology Practice Test Questions

1.The orthopedic surgeon informs you that you have broken the end of your femur. What area is she describing?

A. Bone matrix

B. Diaphysis

C. Epiphysis

D. Shaft

2. All except which of the following is located superior to the maxilla bone?

A. Frontal bone

B. Mandible

C. Nasal bone

D. Zygomatic bone

3. Which of the following is NOT a function of the digestive tract?

A. To perform gas exchange.

B. To remove waste from the body.

C. To use enzymes to break down food.

D. To use peristalsis to move food along.

4. Moving the arm toward the body would be described as a _______ movement, rather than a ______ movement.

A. anterior, superior.

B. distal, proximal.

C. proximal, anterior.

D. proximal, distal.

5. The endocrine system assists what other body system in homeostasis and plays important roles in growth and sexual maturation?

A. Cardiovascular system

B. Integumentary system

C. Nervous system

D. Reproductive system

6. The hormone ____ assists estrogen in stimulating the formation of the endometrium.

A. luteinizing hormone

B. oxytocin

C. progesterone

D. testosterone

7. The axial skeleton consists of how many bones in the vertebral column?

A. 24

B. 26

C. 28

D. 30

8. The femur, tibia, fibula, tarsals, and metatarsals are bones that comprise which of the following?

A. Bony pelvis

B. Lower extremity

C. Pelvic girdle

D. Upper extremity

9. Estrogen serves what primary function in the female reproductive system?

A. It causes fertilization.

B. It initiates the preparation of the endometrium for pregnancy.

C. It triggers the production of breast milk.

D. It triggers the release of the egg from the ovary.

10. Vitamin K is created in the:

A. Intestinal tract.

B. Liver.

C. Lungs.

D. Pancreas.

Answers & Explanations

1. C

The epiphysis is on each end of long bones like the femur.

2. B

The mandible is the facial bone that is located inferior to (below) the maxillofacial bone. The frontal bone, nasal bone, and zygomatic bone are all superior (above) to the maxilla bone.

3. A

The digestive tract performs all of the above functions except for performing a gas exchange, which is a function of the respiratory system.

4. D

This movement is described as a proximal movement, rather than the opposite, which is distal. Proximal can be thought of as ‘proximity’ and distal can be thought of as ‘distant’ to help remember their meanings.

5. C

The endocrine system assists the nervous system in homeostasis and plays important role in the growth and sexual maturation

6. C

Progesterone is a hormone produced by the ovaries and is responsible for maintaining the uterine lining, or endometrium.

Oxytocin is a hormone that is involved with the processes of childbirth and milk production and is released by the pituitary gland.

Luteinizing hormone is also an important hormone for the female reproductive system; however, it is not involved with the formation or maintenance of the endometrium. Instead, it stimulates ovulation along with estrogen. It is also not produced by the reproductive organs but by the pituitary gland in the brain.

Testosterone is the primary male reproductive hormone, however, it is produced in smaller amounts by the ovaries in women. The role of testosterone in women is to regulate libido, body composition, and muscular strength.

7. D

The axial skeleton has 30 bones of the vertebral column. There are 7 cervical vertebrae, 12 thoracic vertebrae, 5 lumbar vertebrae, 5 sacral vertebrae, and the coccygeal vertebrae.

8. B

The bones of the lower extremity include the femur, the tibia and fibula, the tarsals, metatarsals, and the phalanges.

9.B

Estrogen serves to thicken the endometrium in preparation for pregnancy, in addition to other functions. Progesterone also plays a role in endometrium development, counterbalancing the effects of estrogen.

10. A

The intestinal tract contains bacteria that synthesize vitamin K that can be used throughout our body.

HESI Math Review – The Absolute Most Important Topics

HESI Math Review - Six important and necessary topics, that if you know them well enough, will make all the difference in your exam.

The Hesi A2 math section has 6 key topics to pass. Six important and necessary topics, that if you know them well enough, will make all the difference in your exam. These 6 areas of knowledge are integral for anyone looking to successfully pass the Hesi A2 Math Section. After finish this HESI Math review, you can immediately check your Math knowledge with our free HESI practice test. Let’s start!

Fractions

The first topic this HESI Math Review reminds you of is fractions.

A number that results from dividing one whole number by another is called a fraction. It consists of two parts: numerators and denominators. For instance, a quarter is written as 1/4 where 1 is the numerator and 4 is the denominator. Please note that zero is never placed as the denominator.

Fractions can be mixed, like, unlike, or equivalent.

Number line

Fractions have many aspects such as like, unlike, improper, mixed, equivalence, value, and conversion to decimals. In order to learn these aspects, we will construct a number line.

Example: Place the following numbers on a line from smallest to largest:

1⁄4, 1⁄2, 2⁄4, 4⁄2, .3, 1 2⁄4

In the above example, we can see that:

  • 1⁄4 has a smaller value than .3 which can be converted to 1⁄3 in its fraction form
  • 1⁄2 and 2⁄4 are equivalent
  • 1 2⁄4 is a mixed fraction and has a value greater than 1. It can be rewritten as 6⁄4 or 3⁄2 or 1.5. 6⁄4 is the improper version of this fraction.
  • 1⁄4 and 2⁄4 are like
  • 2⁄4 and 4⁄2 are unlike

Adding & Subtracting

  • For like fractions: To add or subtract them, we just simply add or subtract the numerators while keeping the same denominators.

Example: 1⁄4 + 1⁄4 = 2⁄4 which is simplified to 1⁄2 by dividing the numerator and denominator by 2.

  • For unlike fractions: Firstly, you need to convert the fractions to equivalent fractions of the same denominators. Secondly, add or subtract the numerators while keeping the same denominator.

Example: 1⁄2 + 1⁄3 = 3⁄6 + 2⁄6 = 5⁄6

  • For mixed fractions: Firstly, you need to convert them to improper. Secondly, you may simply add the numerators if they are like. In case they are unlike, converting them to equivalent fractions before add or subtract them.

Example: 2 1⁄8 + 3 1⁄6 = 17⁄8 + 19⁄6 = 102⁄48 + 152⁄48 = 254⁄48 which is simplified to 127⁄24 or 5 7⁄24

Multiplication & Division

  • For simple fractions: 
  • To multiple them, you do not need to have like denominators. You simply multiple the numerators and multiple the denominators.

Example:  1⁄2 x 1⁄4 = 1⁄8

  • To divide them: flip the divisor and then multiple across. 

Example:  1⁄4 ÷ 1⁄2 should be rewritten as 1⁄4 x 2⁄1 = 2⁄4 or 1⁄2

  • For mixed fractions: You must convert to improper fractions and then follow the above rules.

 

hesi math review

Decimal

A decimal also represents part of a whole like a fraction. However, a decimal probably has an integer in front of it. For example, 1.5 has an integer of 1 and a decimal of .5 and .5 may be thought of as ½.

Decimals have positions, which are varied by 10. For instance, 74.289 has five positions:

  • Tens: 7
  • Ones: 4
  • Tenths: 2
  • Hundredths: 8
  • Thousandths: 9

To convert a decimal to a fraction, place the decimal number over its place value. 

For example 1.25

  • Ones: 1
  • Tenths: 2
  • Hundredths: 5

Rewrite as 1 + 2⁄10 + 5⁄100

Rewrite with a common denominator: 100⁄100 + 20⁄100 + 5⁄100 = 125⁄100

To convert a fraction to a decimal, divide the numerator by the denominator. If required, you can use a calculator to do this. This will give us our answer as a decimal.

Examples:

  • ⁴/₅ as a decimal is 4 ÷ 5 = 0.8
  • ⁷⁵/₁₀₀ as a decimal is 75 ÷100 = 0.75
  • ³/₆ as a decimal is 3 ÷ 6 = 0.5

Ratios

The relationship between two numbers that compare their quantities is called a ratio. The ratio of two terms “a” and “b” can be written as a:b, or “a is to b.”

For the terms of the same unit: You can compare by dividing

Example: Andrea has 40 pens and David has 20. By dividing each quantity by 20, we get a ratio of 2:1 describing Andrea’s pencils in comparison to David’s.

For the terms of different units: Before comparison, you must convert to the same units

Example: A football field is 200 yards, while a basketball court is 100 ft. When both are converted to feet, we can see that the ratio is 600ft:100ft which is simplified to a size of 6:1.

In some cases, the ratio is known and the terms are unknown

Example: Maria received a bouquet of three-dozen red and white roses for her birthday. The ratio of red to white roses was 3:1. How many red and how many white roses did she receive?

First, we must add the terms: 3 + 1 = 4. Then, we divide the total number of flowers by that: 36: 4 = 9. Then we multiply each term by that. Red: 3 x 9 = 27. White: 1 x 9 = 9. 

It is called a proportion when the ratio is set equal to other ratios. It is denoted by a:b::c:d, meaning the ratio of a & b is equal to the ratio of c & d. Usually, while the 3 terms are known, one of the terms is unknown. We just need to cross multiply the numerators and then solve.

Example: The patient’s weight has dropped 1.5 pounds over the last 4 days. If the rate of weight loss remains the same, how much more weight will be lost in the next 15 days?

1.5/4 = x/15 is solved to show that x = 5.625

Percentages

A ratio of a:b where b is always 100 is called a percentage.

For example, 60% is 60/100

The following are some of the uses of percentages

  • In proportions: 

Example: HPV was contracted at a 54.2% rate among adults 18-59 years of age. How many students in a university of 35,000 are expected to have had HPV?

54,2/100 = x/35,000 is solved to show that x = 18,970 people

  • In calculations:

Example: To prepare 1000mL of normal saline, a .9% NaCl, concentration is necessary: .9100 x 1000 shows that 9 grams of NaCl are required.

Simple Algebra

Algebra is a branch of mathematics dealing with symbols and the rules for manipulating those symbols. In these equations, we set the left-hand side equal to the right-hand side: LHS = RHS

Addition Law

The equation is still equal “A = B” if we add the same number to the LHS & RHS.

Example: Add c to both sides: A + c = B + c

Multiplication Law

The equation is still equal “A = B” if we multiply the LHS & RHS by the same number.

Example: Multiply by m: mA = mB

In algebra, we combine these laws to solve equations by:

  1. On  the side of equality (LHS), just let x
  2. On the other side of the equality (RHS), put the value 

Plugging in the answer choices for the variable and see if they make the equation true on multiple-choice exams is a trick to solving the equation. 

Example: What is the value of x for the equation 3(x-5)=3?

  1. a) 2 -> 3(2-5)≠3
  2. b) 3 -> 3(3-5)≠3
  3. c) 4 -> 3(4-5)≠3
  4. d) 6 -> 3(6-5)=3

The correct answer is d)

Metric system

The last topic in this HESI Math Review is the Metric system.

A standardized method of measuring weight, length, time, and mass is the metric system. 

  • For length, the meter (m) is used. 1m = 1.094yd, 3.281 ft, and 39.37 inches.
  • For mass, the gram (g) is used. 1g = .002 pounds
  • For volume, the liter (l) is used. 1l = 33.81oz
  • For temperature, Celsius (° C) is used. 1° C = 33.8F

The metric systems account for 12% of the HESI A2 math exam because it is an important part of science. Therefore, it’s necessary for you to have a deep knowledge of the metric systems. 

Knowing that each unit moves by a base of 10 is the key to understanding the metric system. For instance, study the table of grams below to see that each value is reduced 10-fold when moving from larger to smaller.

 

Kilogram 

Hectogram

Dekagram

Gram

Decigram

Centigram

Milligram

1000

100

10

1

.1

.01

.001

It is a must for you to know how to convert within the metric system.

Example: Convert 24, 68g to kg = .02468kg

You will also need to know how to convert from US Standard to the metric system.

Example: Given that 1m = .000621 mile, how many miles are in 45km?

First, solve that 1km = .621 mile by moving the decimal 3 places to the right (you may think of this as multiplying by 1000) as you move from meter to km. Next, multiply 45 x .621 to solve the equation = 27.945mi

In conclusion, to pass the Hesi A2 math exam, you must know how to solve the six topics in the above HESI Math review post. Remember to practice it before going to the Hesi A2 Math exam, it will help you become more familiar with these topics and can easily pass them.

Chemistry Study Guide For HESI A2 Exam

This HESI A2 Chemistry study guide will discuss what the chemistry section covers as well as some helpful tips to pass it. Check it out!

Do you want to ace your HESI A2 Chemistry test? Do you need help preparing for the exam? If so, then this Chemistry Study Guide blog post is perfect for you! We will discuss what a HESI A2 Chemistry Test is and what it covers. Then we’ll give you some study tips that will help ensure you succeed on your exam!

chemistry study guide
Chemistry Study Guide

What’s on the HESI A2 Chemistry Test?

If you are thinking of applying to a nursing school, the HESI A2 Chemistry test may be coming up in the near future. Many nursing programs require all applicants to take the HESI A2 exam as part of the admissions process. The HESI A2 consists of seven major components, and schools can select which of the seven they want applicants to take. Many schools do not require applicants to take Chemistry, but many do. If you are unsure whether the school to which you are applying requires it, you should check with them.

There are 30 multiple-choice questions about chemistry though only 25 of those questions count toward your score. In most cases, you will have 25 minutes to complete the HESI Chemistry test, but schools can establish their own restrictions, so you should verify the actual allotted time with your school before taking the exam.

HESI A2 Chemistry Study Guide

Units of Measurement

While most measurements in nursing use the metric system, you may need to be able to approximate the US and/or Imperial measurements as a comparison.

Volume

Volume is usually measured in milliliters (ml) or cubic centimeters (cm3).

  • 1 ml = 0.001 liter
  • 1 ml = 1 cm3

For example: 6L = 6000 ml = 6000 cm3

For larger quantities, US gallons are used in the US, and Imperial gallons are used in the UK. Some helpful conversions are:

  • 1 Imperial gallon = ~ 1.2 US gallons
  • 1 US gallon = ~ 3.79 liters or 231 cubic inches
  • 1 Imperial gallon = ~ 4.55 liters or ~ 277.42 cubic inches
  • 1 liter = 2.11 US pints

Mass and Length

Mass is commonly measured in grams (g) or kilograms (kg), where 1 kg = 1000 g.

  • 1 kg = 2.2 pounds
  • 1 pound = 16 ounces
  • 1 stone = 14 pounds

Length is usually measured in meters (m), centimeters (cm), or millimeters (mm).

  • 1 inch = 2.54 cm
  • 1 foot = 30.5 cm
  • 1 yard = 91.44 cm
  • 1 km = 0.621 miles

States of Matter

There are four fundamental states of matter – solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Solids are characterized by closely packed particles, held together by strong intermolecular forces to form a definite shape. Heating a solid to a temperature above its melting point transforms it into a liquid. In liquids, the intermolecular forces are weaker, meaning the particles have more freedom of movement.

By heating a liquid to a temperature higher than its boiling point, it can be turned into a gas. In a gas, the particles have enough kinetic energy to pass through the intermolecular forces and can freely move. Heating a gas to high temperatures can produce plasma. This leads to the electrons in an atom separating from the nuclei and plasma can be thought of as a cloud of free electrons and positively charged ions.

Atoms

Elements are made of atoms, and atoms are made of three types of particles – negatively charged electrons, positively charged protons, and neutral neutrons.

The protons and neutrons make up the nucleus of the atom. The nucleus has a very small diameter compared to the overall size of the atom, but it is where most of the mass is concentrated. The electrons orbit the nucleus in shells and most of the volume of the atom is taken up by the free space between the nucleus and electrons. 

An element’s nuclear symbol tells you how many electrons, protons, and neutrons make up each atom.

element’s nuclear symbol - Hesi chemistry

where,

X is the element symbol.

A is the mass number, which tells you the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus.

Z is the atomic number, which is the number of protons in the nucleus.

The number of protons is equal to the number of electrons for neutral atoms. The number of neutrons is A – Z. A neutral atom of lithium represented by the nuclear symbol 73Li has three protons, three electrons, and four neutrons, which is the example of the number of protons.

Ions have unequal numbers of protons and electrons. Positive ions have more protons than electrons and negative ions have more electrons than protons.

All atoms of the same element have the same number of protons. Isotopes are atoms of the same element but with different numbers of neutrons. For example, 126C and 136C are both isotopes of carbon.

Acids and Bases

Using the pH scale, we can measure the acidity or basicity of a chemical or solution. The pH scale ranges from 0 to 14 and a pH of 7 is neutral. A solution with a pH lower than 7 is classed as acidic and a solution with a pH higher than 7 is classed as basic.

Hydrochloric acid (HCl), which is part of the acid that is found in the stomach, is a very strong acid with a pH of 1. Water is neutral, with a pH of 7. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) has a pH of 9, making it a weak alkali. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is a very strong alkali and when concentrated can have a pH of 14.

The pH scale is logarithmic with a base of 10. This means that each unit difference corresponds to a change of a factor of 10. pH 3 is 10 times more acidic than pH 4 and 1000 times more acidic than pH 6 is the example for the pH scale mentioned in the following.

Chemical Equations

Balanced equations should have the same number of each type of atom on both sides. You have to alter the number of molecules of one or more compounds on either side of the equation to balance equations. Balance the equation:

C2H6+O2 => CO2+2H2O

This is the first step is to work out the number of atoms on each side:

Left Right

C = 2 C = 1

H = 6 H = 4

O = 2 O = 3

The right side needs 1 more ion of C and 2 more ions of H, so we can add 1 more CO2 compound and 1 more H2O compound and the equation becomes:

C2H6+O2 => 2CO2+3H2O

Left Right

C = 2 C = 2

H = 6 H = 6

O = 2 O = 7

Because we have also added more atoms of O to the right, we now need five more atoms of O on the left to make 7 atoms in total. Add another 2.5 atoms of O2 to the left and the equation is balanced:

C2H6+3.5O2 => 2CO2+3H2O

Left Right

C = 2 C = 2

H = 6 H = 6

O = 7 O = 7

But chemical equations typically do not consist of fractional coefficients, so let’s multiply the entire equation by 2 to eliminate the fraction, 3.5:

2(C2H6)+7(O2) => 4(CO2)+6(H2O)

Chemical Reactions

Particles in liquids and gases are constantly moving and colliding with each other. Under the right conditions, these particles can react. To start a reaction, the particles need to have a minimum amount of kinetic energy, known as the activation energy. This is the amount of energy required to break the bonds within each particle.

The rate of a reaction increases as temperature increases because the particles will have more kinetic energy. This means that they will be moving faster and colliding more often and be more likely to have enough energy to break the activation barrier. Increasing concentration also develops the rate of reaction as this will raise the number of particle collisions.

Catalysts can also be added to raise the reaction rate. These work by lowering the activation energy. In this instance, platinum plays a role of a catalyst in the reaction that makes nitric acid from ammonia. Don’t forget that platinum does not appear in the equation. Because during a chemical reaction a catalyst is not consumed or changed.

NH3+O2 => HNO3

Oxidation and Reduction Reactions

Oxidation is the loss of electrons. Reduction is a gain of electrons. In redox (oxidation and reduction) reactions, oxidation and reduction occur simultaneously.

In the reaction:

2Na+Cl2 => 2Na+Cl

Sodium is oxidized as it loses an electron and chlorine is reduced because it gains an electron – sodium is the electron donor and chlorine is the electron acceptor.

Common mistakes students make while studying for this exam

  • Using the wrong book to study from
  • Not understanding that this is a cumulative test and not focusing on what has been taught in class recently. Pay close attention to the material your professor has gone over, as well as any notes you may have taken during lecture time
  • Not understanding the meaning of a word
  • Forgetting to write down what they just read
  • Ignoring the problems at hand and hoping one will solve itself
  • Studying the wrong material
  • Attempting to study too many topics at once and not focusing on one specific subject area or topic  – Studying the wrong material
  • Attempting to study too many topics at once and not focusing on one specific subject area or topic.

How to study for the HESI A2 Chemistry test?

  • Read your HESI A2 chemistry book (or any other equivalent resource) and take notes
  • Make sure to understand examples in the text by reviewing them, asking questions about difficult concepts, and looking up definitions of words you don’t know
  • Watch YouTube videos that are related to chemistry or watch a lecture on the topic
  • Take good notes in class so that they can be your study guide for tests
  • Study with friends! Mimicking each other’s answers is an effective way to learn new material

Tips on how to succeed on the HESI A2 chemistry exam

In this chemistry study guide, we recommend you these useful tips to pass the exam:              

  • Always have a study plan and stick to it! For example, you might want to do one chapter each day for three days before your test. Make sure that there is time in between studying sessions where you rest so that you can absorb new information more effectively.
  • Take the exams in a testing environment. You might not be used to taking tests in your regular classroom, but practicing on test day is important because it may feel more like you’re taking an actual exam
  • Set up realistic expectations for what kind of grades you will get and make sure that you are reaching out to your professor if you have any questions
  • Read the instructions carefully. Be sure that you are answering multiple-choice and true/false questions correctly because they count for more points and could be harder to figure out if you get them wrong
  • Get plenty of sleep! This seems like a no brainer, but it’s easy to forget when you’re cramming the night before your test
  • Don’t let yourself get too hungry or thirsty. You need to have a clear head in order to answer questions and you’ll be more likely to choke on difficult words if you’re thinking about food!            
  • Make sure that there is enough time for everything, but don’t go overboard. You don’t want to spend too much time on any one question and get stuck there.
  • If possible, study with a group of friends or classmates. You’ll have more fun studying if you’re able to hang out and laugh while taking breaks!
  • Get your thoughts down on paper before the test so that it’s easier for you to organize them. This will make it feel more like you’re doing a study guide and less stressful overall    
  • Don’t let yourself get too high or low based on how well you did the first time through an exam or quiz! You should take breaks to refresh your mind by playing games, reading articles, listening to music, etc. 
  • Review your notes after you’ve taken a break and make sure that there are no gaps in your knowledge!     
  • If you know the answer to a question but can’t remember it, try using an acronym or mnemonic device. You may need to look things up if these devices don’t work for you. Use whatever works for you! This will help the information stick in your memory     
  • If you’re taking a break from studying, try closing out all other windows and apps so that they don’t distract you. Also, turn off notifications on your phone or computer while doing this to avoid distractions
  • Don’t get frustrated if what feels like an obvious answer to a question eludes you. You can always try another method of studying, do some research online, or ask your peers for help.

Hesi A2 Chemistry Practice Test Resource

Where can you find Hesi A2 Materials and Test Resources? We highly recommend that you use our online HESI practice test and HESI A2 study guide with complete guidance and practice tests with explanations, and short assessments to measure your understanding. It can help you prepare for exam day by giving you a strong math foundation. Moreover, thousands of practice questions are divided into specific categories (exam topics) to let you get a deeper understanding.

Let’s practice now!

HESI Biology Study Guide

Are you gearing up to take the hesi biology test? We'll go into detail about what the Biology exam entails and some tips to study for it.

Are you gearing up to take the HESI A2 Biology test? If so, then this blog post is for you! We’ll go into detail about what the exam entails, how to study for it, and what some helpful tips are.

HESI A2 Biology Review

There are 30 questions on the exam and we recommend that the time limit for the Biology test is 25 minutes. Most schools will, but there is a possibility that your school may establish a different time limit, so before exam day, be sure to check it. All information that you need is on the nursing school’s website.

What’s on the HESI A2 Biology Test?

hesi biology
HESI Biology Study Guide

To do well on the Biology section of the HESI exam, There are some main concepts that need to know:

Classification of Organisms

Living things are classified by a system developed by Carl Linnaeus. Organisms are often named by the binomial system of genus and species. 

The classification of species allows the subdivision of living organisms into smaller and more specialized groups.

Kingdoms

The first division of living things in the classification system is to put them into one of five kingdoms. They are: 

  • animals (all multicellular animals)
  • plants (all green plants)
  • fungi (molds, mushrooms, yeast)
  • protists (Amoeba, Chlorella, and Plasmodium)
  • prokaryotes (bacteria, blue-green algae)

Further divisions

We can rank the living things according to:

  • phylum
  • class
  • order
  • family
  • genus
  • species

The kingdom is broken into Phylum that has many different organisms. For examples:

  • Chordata, which have backbones
  • Arthropod, which has jointed legs and an exoskeleton
  • Annelids, which are segmented worms

The class follows Phylum. For example, class results in the Chordata phylum being divided into:

  • Mammals
  • Birds
  • Amphibians
  • Fish
  • Reptiles

The order follows class and as an example, mammals can be further subdivided into a variety of different groups such as:

  • Carnivores
  • Primates

The Family follows the order. Here are some examples of which carnivores can be split into:

  • Canidae – dogs
  • Felidae – cats

Genus, the Felidae family can be further divided into 4 genus examples:

  • Acinonyx – cheetah
  • Panthera – lion and tiger
  • Neofelis – clouded leopard
  • Felis – domestic cats

Species is the final classification stage. The genus Panthera includes:

  • Panthera leo (lion)
  • Panthera tigris (tiger)

As an example, the complete breakdown of the classification of lions:

  • kingdom – animal
  • phylum – vertebrate
  • class – mammal
  • order – carnivorous
  • family – cat
  • genus – big cat
  • species – lion

The Scientific Method

The Scientific Method is a method of devising and performing experiments that yield meaningful results. It includes a procedural approach to collecting information about the physical world that starts with a formulated question and ends with the rejection of a hypothesis and the reevaluation of the experiment.

We can summarize The Scientific Method as the following:

Question – A curiosity about a phenomenon increases and, in response, a question is formulated. Early thinkers looked at the sky and wondered why it was blue or looked at the grass and wondered why it was green.

Research – After formulating a question, a scientist looks for any relevant research or data already discovered and provided for the phenomenon in question. This is useful in giving some direction in how to build or approach the question.

Hypothesis – The scientist then created a hypothesis, or an educated guess, as to what could be causing the phenomenon. This step is useful in narrowing down the possible options or experimentation.

Experiment – Using available measuring tools and technology, to provide valuable data for the scientist to investigate, an experiment is designed.

Evaluation – The data will then be analyzed and assessed for its validity. Do the observations made support the hypothesis, or do they support a different hypothesis?

Conclusion – In the end, the scientist will determine if the hypothesis is confirmed, in which case other scientists will then recreate the same experiment to identify that the results hold true at a different time or place not using the different methods. The scientist may select to change some of the experimental methods or devise a new hypothesis if the hypothesis is not confirmed.

In summary, the Scientific Method provides a methodical method for investigating experiments, data, and drawing conclusions. It is worthwhile to see that developments in scientific research do not increase from haphazard guessing and checking, but rather through logical design and reasoning. Even a basic familiarity with the method will prove useful while making sense of scientific experiments.

Cells, Tissues, and Organs

The most fundamental unit of life is the cell. Organisms that exist as a single cell, like bacterium, are called prokaryotes and those that are multicellular, like humans, are called eukaryotes. The main difference between these two groups is that eukaryotes possess a nucleus and membrane-bound organelles when prokaryotes do not.

Starting with the knowledge of the cell, its form, and function, we can begin to make sense of how life operates, and what cellular features enable this operation. Learning the components of the cell is not a difficult task, but it can be tedious.

One great way to learn about cells is to complement lists of cellular components/features with drawings of cells – this is particularly useful for eukaryotic cells and their organelles. Accompany these drawings with the name of the cell “part” and what its function or purpose is. For instance, the nucleus houses genetic information and instructions for cellular operations; the mitochondrion helps generate ATP to provide energy for the cell… In studying the differences between plant, animal, and bacterial cells, a mini whiteboard can be a huge asset. Repeatedly diagramming the elements of the various cell types and their parts (noting similarities and differences) will cause long-term retention.

When a group of cells functions together to accomplish tasks, they are operating as tissue. Due to the differences at the cellular level, plants and animals organize into different types of tissue. Plants possess meristematic tissues, which enable them to increase in size, and permanent tissues, which enable them to maintain their form.

Animals possess connective, epithelial, muscle, and nervous tissues. As the tissues in plants, these groups serve different functions and have different forms. Connective tissues provide structure to organisms. Epithelial tissues are those found where cells line and cover organs. Muscle tissue allows animals to move, and nervous tissue enables animals to send and receive signals to its different parts.

Just as cells combine to form tissues, tissues combine to form organs. Humans possess an extensive list of organs that all serve a particular function: some help digest food to provide energy, while others help circulate air and blood. And, like tissues, organs act collaboratively to form organ systems.

The same approach of studying the cells and their functions can be applied to tissues, organs, and then organ systems. It is most important to generate your own diagrams when learning the form and function of these different systems. It is easy to believe that one has a solid grasp of these things when reading from a book or even a page of notes; however, this is much different from being able to work from the ground up in describing the composition of organisms. Condense lists of organismal features into its basic parts, and work through repeatedly processing this information with the aid of a whiteboard and note cards.

Genetics and Heredity

Heredity is the passing on of genetic traits from one generation to the next; it is the reason that children resemble parents, and why humans give birth to other humans. Genetics is the study of the principles underlying heredity.

Workable knowledge of genetics is impossible without becoming familiar with DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). This familiarity entails its composition [knowing that guanine, cytosine, adenine, and thymine (also known as GCAT) are its nucleotides, knowing how they pair, and knowing that its strands run antiparallel, among other features], as well as its function (to house and maintain the instructions for a cell’s operations).

An understanding of “the central dogma” of molecular biology, which states that genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to proteins, can serve as a great outline for how gene transfer takes place. Before moving on to transcription and translation, understanding can help you be familiar with DNA replication, the details of which can be processed through learning the names and functions of the various structures and enzymes involved. Because this is a systematic procedure that incorporates many different parts, drawing and redrawing diagrams can prove worthwhile for long-term retention of the operations.

When these operations are understood, a more general understanding of genetics can be studied. A familiarity with Gregor Mendel and his laws (Law of Dominance, Law of Segregation, and the Law of Independent Assortment) can act as a solid foundation for genetic transfer beyond the microscopic scale. This will lead one to learn about parents, first and second generations, and the expression of phenotypes as predicted with Punnett squares.

Much difficulty in studying genetics and heredity stems from the necessity of learning an exhaustive number of terms and definitions. Intelligent utilization of flashcards and diagrams can address these problems.

Mitosis and Meiosis

Mitosis and meiosis are processes by which cells reproduce. A mitosis is a form of asexual reproduction where the resulting cell is genetically identical to the parent cell, whereas meiosis results in a cell that contains only half of the chromosomes found in the parent cell. It is wise to note both the similarities and the differences when reviewing the two processes. Similar to the method used for recalling the various taxonomic classes, a mnemonic device can prove valuable in learning the stages of mitosis and meiosis.

While these two reproduction methods share essentially the same steps, it can be useful to think that because meiosis is involved in sexual reproduction, a method for diversifying life; it is more complicated than mitosis. Recalling this can help you remember which mnemonic goes with which process.

Familiarity with the cell cycle is helpful in understanding these two processes. Cells do not arbitrarily reproduce, nor do they reproduce nonstop. Instead, there are triggers and signals that must be present before a cell will begin reproduction. Mitosis can be broken down into four main stages: prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. But there are two additional “stages” of interphase and cytokinesis. The acronym IPMATC can be useful in recalling the order in which these stages happen.

Meiosis shares the same stages, but it occurs in two ordered sequences, so there is an IPMAT 1 and an IPMAT 2. The best method for retaining the details involved in both processes is to utilize a whiteboard and diagrams, drawing and redrawing the steps until this can be done without the aid of any reference material. It may sound repetitive, but this method of learning is invaluable for gaining functional knowledge of this material.

Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis is the process by which plants transform the energy in light into chemical energy that can be used to fuel life functions. A solid grasp of photosynthesis entails an understanding of what cellular structures enable the process (think chloroplasts, and other structures present in plant cells that are not in animal cells) as well as how the process happens (without carbon dioxide and water the process cannot take place).

Just as you should be familiar with the chemical equation governing cellular respiration (the energy liberating process in animal cells), you should also understand the chemical equation relating to the reactants and products of photosynthesis. Both of these processes rely upon the transfer of free electrons to generate chemical energy. And, just as animal cells carry out the Krebs cycle to generate ATP, plants carry out the Calvin cycle to generate energy. Analogs like this are very useful to recognize as they can reduce two distinct processes into a single concept and thus simplify the material to be learned.

Familiarity with the different types of photosynthesis is also useful to learn. Some types require the presence of light whereas others can be performed in the absence of light. An understanding of what biological purpose or function this serves can be helpful. Similarly to all of the other systems and processes, the usage of a whiteboard and diagrams, as well as a complementary list of the cellular features necessary, can prove invaluable when reviewing involved procedures such as photosynthesis. However, when you can already generate the information without the aid of reference materials, you can be certain that you have developed a firm comprehension of the concept.

Helpful tips for the HESI A2 biology test

Make flashcards. You can either make them yourself with the help of friends, classmates, or family members; you could buy pre-made cards from stores like Target and Walmart; or if not, use sites online such as StudyBlue to create your own deck of study cards at no cost. Flashcards serve as a great way to review important concepts.

Take practice quizzes, exams, and tests before the HESI A21 Biology exam date. This allows you to get a feel for what will be on your test so that when it comes time for the actual exam day, you’ll know what to expect. It also helps reduce anxiety as many people are more nervous about recalling information than putting it together.

Use a study planner to help you plan your time during the week and divide up work for each day so that you’re not overwhelmed. You can make this as simple or detailed as you want, but just try to map out when and how much studying will happen on any given day of the week.

Never start studying for the HESI A21 Biology exam without knowing what you’re going to do after. If that means taking a break from study, make sure you establish when and why it’s appropriate to take one before starting your work.

When studying for the exam, it’s important to work on your strengths and weaknesses. If you’re really struggling with a particular subject or concept, take notes in class so that you can spend more time drilling down into what you find difficult later.

Hesi A2 Biology Practice Test Resource

Where can you find Hesi A2 Materials and Test Resources? We highly recommend that you use our HESI practice website with complete guidance and practice tests with explanations, and short assessments to measure your understanding. It can help you prepare for exam day by giving you a strong math foundation. Take our HESI practice test now!

 

HESI A2 Grammar Study Guide (2021)

The Hesi A2 Grammar Study Guide is designed to help you prepare for the Grammar Section of the HESI A2 exam. Check it out now!

The Hesi A2 Grammar Study Guide is designed to help you prepare for the Grammar Section of the HESI A2 exam. This study guide covers all of the concepts that may be tested on this exam. It also provides tips for how to pass the Grammar Test as well as a free HESI A2 practice test source for you. We hope that this blog post helps prepare you for success!

hesi a2 grammar practice test

HESI A2 Grammar Test

Grammar is the final test in the English and language arts portion of the HESI. Being skilled in reading and understanding written passages is very important to success in nursing school, and so is having a large and wide-ranging vocabulary. However, these aren’t enough by themselves. It’s also very important to have a strong grasp of grammar, which is basically the set of rules that govern how to use a language. Of course, there are a lot of different rules that govern how to use English, and many of them are very complicated.

Like the other two exams, it also has 55 questions (five of which don’t count). The recommended time limit for Grammar is 50 minutes, but you’ll want to check with your school to find out the actual time limit you’ll be up against. Many people who have taken all of the sections report that they found the Grammar test to be the most difficult of the three exams in the English portion of the HESI.

What’s On the HESI A2 Grammar Test?   

Parts of Speech

Remember all the lessons about nouns and verbs? Well, those could come in really handy right about now! Be sure to familiarize yourself with the eight parts of speech: noun, verb, adverb, adjective, preposition, conjunction, pronoun, and interjection. It may also be helpful to know what these mean: pronoun-antecedent, subject, and predicate.

For example, you know a verb is an action or being word. Well, a predicate is just the verb, plus the other words that go with the verb.

Look at this sentence:

Harry wrote the letter neatly.

Wrote is the verb and wrote the letter neatly is the predicate.

Verb Forms and Tenses

This is an important concept you should pay attention to while studying for the HESI A2 Grammar Test.

Besides knowing what part of speech verbs are, you must know what form and tense of a verb to use in different situations. For instance, do you use ring, rang, or rung, when talking about a bell? The rule for this is: ring is what a bell does in the present tense, rang is in the past, and rung is in the past perfect and must use has, had, or have. Other words like this include swim and bring (there is no such word as brang). Candidates may make some very common errors with these words: see, saw, seen.

You can say, “I saw,” but not “I seen.” You have to use have or had with seen. The same goes for ride, rode, and have/has/had ridden. But never use have, had, or has with saw or rode. Yeah, isn’t the English language great?

Pronoun Use

Unless you are about 2 years old, you know that the sentence “Her went to the store” does not sound right. But what about this? Which one is correct?

– Jamie called Butch and I to dinner.

– Jamie called Butch and me to dinner.

Believe it or not, it’s the second one. The word me is used for objects and I is used for subjects in a sentence. An easier way to determine me versus I is to take the other person out of the sentence and see which sounds right. “Jamie called I to dinner” just doesn’t cut it. It would be “Jamie and I went to dinner” because “Me went to dinner” is just wrong.

Also, practice the use of him and her, as well as when to use himself or herself, instead. Oh, and there is also no such word as “theirselves.”

Capitalization

If you’ve read things on social media lately, you know that some people can go a little crazy with capital letters. Some people use them all the time and some, not at all. For this test, you’ll need to prove you know the rules.

Basically, all sentences and proper nouns (the name of a person, place, or thing) begin with a capital letter. So do titles of people (Mr., Dr., etc.) and a few other word types. You can find a number of lists of capitalization rules online to help you nail this skill.

There are some tricky things to capitalization, too. For example, look at the word dad in these sentences. Both are correct.

– My dad is my best friend.

– I told Dad to come with us.

Why the difference? In the second sentence, Dad is used as a name. In the first, it is not. Saying, “my dad” is the same as saying, “my ball, my dog, my pencil,” none of which need capital letters.

Punctuation

Punctuation basics are easy, right? A period at the end of a sentence, question mark after a question, etc. But there are some confusing points, too. Here are a few rules to remember:

Commas used in a series of words typically include one before the word and in academic writing: I had apples, peaches, and pears for lunch. This is the serial comma, or also known as the Oxford comma. It is a matter of style preference, so remember to check the preferred style guide of the institution, or school, for whom you are writing, or read test instructions, and practice consistency.)

An apostrophe used to show possession is always directly after the person/s or animal/s that actually possess/es the thing: If the bone belongs to one dog, it is “the dog’s bone,” but if it belongs to two or more dogs, it is “the dogs’ bone.”

Looking up other apostrophe rules would be a good idea. There are many.

Apostrophes are not used just to form a plural! “I love my baby’s” is just not right. It should be babies.

Quotation marks: Generally, all other forms of punctuation are written inside the quotes. Jean said, “I am the oldest person here.” And “Hi!” said Tom.

Review where to use a hyphen (-).

Confusing Words

The English language has many confusing words. The Grammar section of the HESI exam will test your knowledge of a few of them. To prepare for this section of the test, take note of the following reminders:

Know the differences among your/you’re, there/their/they’re, and its/it’s. You should be able to split any two words that are joined with an apostrophe into those two words and have the sentence still make sense.

Example: “I saw you’re house” may sound right, but if you split you’re into two words, it becomes “I saw you are house,” which is not right. By the same token, “Your my best friend” is not right, either. This time, it is supposed to have the equivalent of you are in it, so “You’re my best friend” works.

Other tricky words to study include: accept/except, effect/affect, and advice/advise. Example: He gives advice. But, He did not advise her.

Know when to use lay and lie, less and fewer, harder and hardest, etc. Trick: Use -er ending when comparing two things and -est for three or more.

It should be “I could have danced all night,” not “I could of danced all night.”

Its is the only possessive that doesn’t have an apostrophe. It’s, with the apostrophe, means it is.

Sentence Structure

Some of the questions will ask you to decide which form of a sentence is correct. What this means is, “Which form makes the meaning most clear to you, the reader?” This may involve punctuation or word usage. There may be two answers that are actually correct, but only one of them is best.

For example, Jane was just thinking of John, not Tim, when she ran into him. (It is not clear who she ran into.)

This is better: Jane had been thinking of John when she ran into Tim.

Other Items

It would probably be a good idea to know what each of the following items means and to be able to tell if a sentence has them and where they are in the sentence:

– dependent clause

– independent clause

– weak clause

– active verb tense

Word Pairs and Common Mistakes

Some of the questions in the grammar subsection of the test will be related to clauses, word pairing, and common grammatical mistakes. For example:

Read the following sentences and determine which sentence includes only an independent clause and which includes a dependent clause

  1. Jim went walking in the park
  2. Jim went walking because he needs to lose weight

The first sentence contains only an independent clause. Jim is the subject and went walking is the verb. This statement can stand on its own. The second sentence contains a dependent clause: because he needs to lose weight. This clause cannot stand on its own and needs the independent clause, Jim went walking.

Read the following sentences and identify the correct missing words

  1. Dostoyevsky is the man___ wrote Crime and Punishment
  2. I asked to ___ the package had been delivered

Word pairs are words that have similar meanings and uses and can be easily confused. In the first question, the answer is who. Sometimes, people will use that instead of who, but who should be used when discussing a person. The second answer is whom, which is only used in the objective case (when the pronoun is the object and not the subject), rather than the nominative case (referring to the subject).

Read the following sentences and determine which sentence is a run-on

  1. John and I took a trip to Paris it was a really good experience.
  2. Betsy and Phil went to Italy, and they had a lot of fun.

The first sentence is a run-on sentence. It should read: John and I took a trip to Paris. It was a really good experience. Or, alternatively: John and I took a trip to Paris, and it was a really good experience. The sample sentence contains two clauses that run together. It is missing punctuation, or punctuation, and a transition word.

Tips to study for the Grammar section

There are some tips you should know and remember when studying and taking the test:

  • Know which punctuation to use, and when.  
  • Study the English usage of pronouns.  
  • Learn how to correctly use possessives.
  • Review subject-verb agreement thoroughly so that you are confident in your answers.
  • You will meet many questions in these three areas: sentence structure, word choice, and punctuation.   
  • Make sure to study the Apostrophe section as it’s a common mistake in college-level English courses.  
  • When you see an abbreviation, make sure that you know what dates are abbreviated.
  • Review the Comma rules for Quotations and lists of items.
  • Remember that there are two sets of homophones and they’re often confused.

A great way to study Grammar is to read a lot, so practice reading the newspaper as if you were going back in time – without an Internet connection!   

Hesi A2 Grammar Practice Test Resource

Where you can find the HESI A2 practice test resource? We highly recommend that you use our HESI exam training website with a complete HESI A2 study guide and practice tests with explanation, and short assessments to measure your understanding. It can help you prepare for exam day by giving you a strong grammar foundation. 

Thousand of HESI A2 practice questions and various full practice test will help you boost your knowledge and get 100% familiar with the test format. Take it now!

HESI A2 Vocabulary Study Guide

Do you want to do well on the Hesi A2 vocabulary test? Let's read our detailed study guide and then take the free HESI practice test now!

Do you want to do well on the HESI A2 vocabulary test? We have created a study guide for you that is full of words and definitions. HESI A2 vocabulary study guide is designed to help you learn and retain the words that are used in your Hesi exam. It includes a list of important words, their definitions, an example sentence, and tips for how to remember them. We hope that this blog post helps prepare you for success!

HESI A2 Vocabulary practice test

What’s On the HESI A2 Vocabulary Test?

This test contains 55 multiple-choice items and a recommended 50-minute time limit for this portion of the HESI, but schools are free to use a different time limit. You should make it a point to verify the time limit with your school before you take the test. Like the other two sections, Vocabulary also contains five questions that won’t count toward your score because they’re being used for research and development purposes.

The HESI A2 Vocabulary Test is quite basic – it is designed to assess how extensive your vocabulary is, as well as your ability to identify the meaning of words you haven’t encountered before. This involves understanding an unfamiliar word by using context clues or word elements. Much of the reading you’ll do in nursing school will be on topics you’ve never read much about before, so you’ll need to have a good vocabulary. The exam will cover words that the average person uses every day, as well as more complex terms that most people do not use on a regular basis. It is necessary to keep in mind that the HESI’s Vocabulary section will also include some medical terminology. Medical terms are one area where memorizing several word roots, as well as prefixes and suffixes, will often be enough to make the meaning of a medical word clear, even if you’ve never seen it before.

Medical Terminology

Unlike many other jobs, a medical position requires a working knowledge of a litany of concepts and terms that are largely foreign to the populace at large. To brush up on this aspect of the medical field, read as much and as frequently as possible. Read textbooks, read journals and reports, and read articles related to the medical field. This will allow you to catch a glimpse not only of terminology but of usage as well.

Study terms and their usage. While vocabulary is essential to communicating and understanding others in the medical field, you must not only be able to identify the meanings of words, but also be able to put those words into action and place them properly in sentences. Be sure to also study context and placement.

Common Medical Prefixes and Their Meanings

In the HESI A2 Vocabulary Test, you may meet the questions about Medical Prefixes and Their Meanings.

Medical prefixes function the same way that standard prefixes do; they are used to alter the meaning of a root word. In the medical field, prefixes are usually used to describe the state of a patient, or a procedure. Here is a list of the most common medical prefixes and their meanings:

A/Ah ― Without

Arteri ― Artery

Arthro ― Bone joint

Bi ― Twice/double

Carcin ― Cancer

Chol ― Bile

Cis ― On the same side of

Crani ― Head/skull

Cyt ― Cell

Derm ― Skin

Ect ― Outer/outside

Ferri ― Iron

Gyn ― Woman

Hema ― Blood

Hist ― Tissue

Hyster ― Uterus

Kerat ― Cornea

Kinesi ― Movement

Lacto ― Milk

Leuko ― White

Mast ― Breast

Melan ― Black

Necro ― Death

Onco ― Tumor

Osseo ― Bone

Pan ― All/entire

Common Medical Suffixes and Their Meanings

Like traditional suffixes, medical suffixes are used to bring further clarity to a root word and are attached to the end of a root. These words are frequently applied to words to denote an operation or procedure. The most common medical suffixes are identified as follows:

Ac/Acal ― Of/pertaining to

Aemia ― Blood condition

Algia ― Pain

Centesis ― Surgical puncture

Crine ― To secrete

Cyte ― Cell

Dynia ― Pain

Ectasis ― Expansion/dilation

Ectomy ― Surgical procedure/removal

Genic ― Formative

Gnosis ― Knowledge Graph ― Record/picture

Iasis ― Condition

Iatry ― Field of medicine

Icle ― Small

Ismus ― Spasm/contraction

Itis ― Inflammation

Lysis ― Destruction/separation

Oma ― Mass/collection

Penia ― Deficiency

Pepsia ― Digestion/digestive tract

Plasty ― Repair/reconstruction

Plexy ― Stroke/seizure

Rrhagia ― Rapid flow of blood

Scopy ― Viewing

Tensive ― Pressure

Common Vocabulary Concepts

“Vocabulary” is a word used to describe one’s verbal arsenal. Your vocabulary reflects significantly upon your breadth of knowledge, as it reveals how much exposure you have had to advanced concepts―not merely in the medical field, but in all academia, and even in day-to-day life. Someone with a well-rounded vocabulary is capable of retaining language needed to function on a coherent level with other adults and of engaging in more “high-minded” discussion, such as current events or academic concepts.

The greatest asset in developing a solid vocabulary is the ability to read thoroughly and efficiently. While some amount of your vocabulary can be developed through speaking and practice, reading exposes you to words you might not encounter any other way, and it reveals methods of speaking you might not have considered outside of your social circle. To develop a well-rounded vocabulary, place your primary focus on reading items of all natures, ranging from magazine articles to academic journals, to novels. Exposure is key to nurturing an expansive vocabulary.

To assist in your development, three basic vocabulary concepts are identified: prefixes, suffixes, and root words.

Prefixes

A prefix is an add-on placed ahead of a word to change or enhance its meaning. “Pre” is an example of a prefix used to denote “before.” “Post” is another prefix that denotes “after.” The following is a list of the most common prefixes and their meanings.

Anti ― Against

Co ― With/alongside

Dis ― Not

Ex ― Out of/former

Il/Im ― Not/without

Inter ― Between

Non ― Without

Omni ― All/every

Post ― After

Pre ― Before

Sub ― Under/below

Trans ― Across

Un ― Not

Suffixes

Suffix is also a type of questions that often appears in the HESI A2 Vocabulary Exam

Suffixes are the opposite of prefixes; they come after a word, though they are still used to change or further explain a root word. Suffixes can be more difficult to identify than prefixes, but as you read, you will find that you are familiar with most of the common suffixes used in the English language today. The most frequently used suffixes denote the passage of time.

Here is a list of the most common suffixes.

Able ― Capable/capable of being

Ate ― Become

Dom ― Place/state of being

Er ― More than/one who

Esque ― Like/reminiscent of

Ful ― Notable for

Ish ― Having the quality of

Ist ― One who

Ment ― Condition of

Ness ― State of being

Ship ― Position held

Y ― Characterized by

Roots

Roots are words that contain the idea or thought being prevailed upon by prefixes and suffixes. In the word “beautiful,” for instance, the root of the word is “beauty,” while the suffix is “ful.” Roots can be difficult to identify because they may require alteration to function with a prefix or suffix, as in the case of “beautiful.” For this reason, it is pivotal to familiarize yourself with common prefixes and suffixes; once you are familiar with the most common ones, you can more readily discover the root of words bearing additions. A few examples are given as follows:

Preview: “Pre” is the prefix, while “view” is the root.

Interchangeable: “Inter” is the prefix, “change” is the root, and “able” is the suffix.

Fanciful: “Fancy” is the root, while “ful” is the suffix.       

Tips and tricks to remember the vocabulary

  • Use flashcards.  (List of good resources)
  • Try to find words that have the same root or an obvious connection with each other and review them together.
  • Review new vocabulary as soon as you see it, before moving on to more material in a coursebook, online lesson, etc. so that they are fresh in your mind.
  • Use a vocabulary notebook to hold words and their definitions, as well as the derivation of each word if you know it
  • Take advantage of online resources that have prebuilt flashcards for every new word or use an app (you can find in passemall.com) that allows you to make your own cards with any word.   
  • Consider writing vocabulary words on your hand or arm with a permanent marker and then using an app to take pictures of the word so that it can be quickly looked up in case you forget what it means at any point.
  • Look for different ways to practice the same thing, because when we do this material over and over again, we become more familiar with it and are less likely to forget.
  • Be sure you’re practicing the pronunciation of new words in a variety of ways so that you can show what your word means without having to say anything at all!                

How to study for the Hesi A2 vocabulary exam?

The key is practice, practice, and more practice.

It’s a good idea to get into the habit of studying vocabulary words multiple times in one day so that you can go back later on if you forget what it means or how it is pronounced.

When studying new words from your textbook for class, try reciting them aloud after reading them.

Try to find synonyms and antonyms so that you can be familiar with the most common words used in your class.

Keep a list of new vocabulary words on hand, whether it’s by writing them down or using some sort of app in passmall.com (which I highly recommend).

Read over these words when you have time, and try to use them in a sentence.

It is also important that you take the time to study words from your textbook for class because they often contain new vocabulary words or more difficult synonyms/antonyms which will give context as to how these words are used in everyday life.

If you find what you’re studying hard to remember, try looking up the word in a dictionary.

Using these methods will help your vocabulary grow and improve over time, which can only make for an easier semester of learning.

Hesi A2 Vocabulary Practice Test Resources

Where you can find the free Hesi A2 Practice Test Resource?

We highly recommend that you use our website with a complete HESI A2 study guide and practice tests with a detailed explanation for each question, and short assessments to measure your understanding. It can help you prepare for exam day by giving you a strong math foundation. 

Moreover, thousands of free HESI practice questions are gamified. All you need to do is to practice round by round just like playing a game. When feeling confident with the knowledge you gained from the practice section, you can familiarize yourself with our available HESI practice tests. Take it now!